Activating Deep Approach To Learning In Large Classes Through Quizzes

Activating Deep Approach To Learning In Large Classes Through Quizzes

M. Wedel (2011).  Activating Deep Approach To Learning In Large Classes Through Quizzes . 6.

Large classes are challenging when designing learning activities suitable from a perspective of constructive alignment and at the same time being restricted to large class lectures due to external factors. In the present study a learning activity was desired to increase reflection and active repetition in a large class (75-100 students) of engineering students in a basic course in Materials Science and Engineering. Current repetition by lecturing was not satisfying from a learning perspective. Well known techniques such as mud cards and concept questions were not feasible, mainly for reasons of time to manage feedback or design proper concept questions. The aim of this paper is to describe a newly designed learning activity called Reflection quizzes, the process of design and also to analyse how student learning was affected. The result of the Reflection quizzes was overwhelming. The students were all actively engaged but took on different approaches; some discussed together (peer learning), some competed against each other (increasing motivation), some wanted to sit on their own using their notes (reflecting). The student survey showed that students appreciated to test themselves without it being assessed, many stated that the best was to find out why wrong was wrong and it was clear that they took on a more deep approach towards learning. 

 

Authors (New): 
Maria Knutson Wedel
Pages: 
6
Affiliations: 
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
Keywords: 
Large classes
Active learning
Deep approach to learning
Year: 
2011-01-01 00:00:00
Reference: 
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Edström K., Soderholm D., Knutson Wedel M., Brodeur D., “Teaching and Learning”, In Rethinking Engineering Education - The CDIO approach, auth. E. Crawley, Malmqvist, J., Brodeur, D., Östlund, S., pp 130-151, Springer-Verlag, New York, 2007.: 
Mosteller, F., 1989, “The ‘Muddiest Point in the Lecture’ as a Feedback Device.” On Teaching and Learning, vol. 3, pp. 10-21. Available at http://bokcenter.harvard.edu/docs/mosteller.html: 
Mazur, E., Peer Instruction: A User's Manual. Prentice Hall, NJ, 1997.: 
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